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Posted by stylesen

OSI Days 2010 talkI was one of the speakers at OSI Days 2010. It was a 3 days event from 19th to 21st September, 2010 organized in Chennai Trade Centre and is one of the biggest open source event conducted every year in India. Though I have given many talks in many conferences, this is subtly different from whatever I ve done so far.

The audience for the event was extremely extraordinary. They know what to ask!

I participated as a panel member on 19th September, 2010 in a panel discussion on the topic "The Rapidly growing market for FOSS in India". This panel had elite people from the IT industry with whom I had a chance to network and discuss lot of things about FOSS. The panel included the following people:

Posted by stylesen

microblogging clients cover pageAn article titled "A Roundup on Microblogging clients", which I wrote for Linux For You magazine and got published in March 2010 issue.

A gist from the article is follows, you can download the entire article from the attachment to this post,

The latest buzz in social networking is microblogging - the next generation of blogging where people share their status, images, audio and video files with their friends without being verbose. When you microblog, you answer one simple question: “What’s happening?” Some of us are already into microblogging,
without quite realising that there is a term for the small text we enter in our IM clients and elsewhere to publish our status. And some of us are microblog addicts, already!

Many full-fledged social networking sites like Facebook, Orkut, Linkedin, etc, provide ways to microblog, though they’re all referred to by different names, such as ‘Updates’, ‘Status Update’, etc. There are also dedicated sites just for microblogging, like identi.ca, twitter.com, tumblr.com, present.ly, yammer.com and many more.

See attachment below to download the complete article in pdf.

Posted by stylesen

Haiku lfy article cover

An article titled "An OS for Personal Computing (Haiku)", which I wrote for Linux For You magazine and got published in February 2010 issue.

A gist from the article is follows, you can download the entire article from the attachment to this post,

GNU/Linux has lots of features for the desktop and the server side. However, there are problems with Linux-based operating systems. Being a monolithic kernel, people often find the system becomes unresponsive when using a GNU/Linux system. Another major problem, especially for new users, is choosing between various distributions. They end up installing a distribution that has more apps and services than they actually need (or that their hardware can support) for their day to day use, which also serves to slow down their systems.

This article introduces you to an operating system called Haiku, which serves as a good starting point for aspiring students and those interested in hacking on operating systems.

Posted by stylesen

damn simple linux LFY article cover

An article on customizing Damn Small Linux, which I wrote for Linux For You magazine and got published in January 2010 issue.

A gist from the article is follows, you can download the entire article from the attachment to this post,

There's an old unused computer at home that doesn't have a great hardware profile—a Pentium II processor with 64 MB of RAM. I wanted to use this computer meaningfully, and hence came up with this idea of customising Damn Small Linux (DSL), a small GNU/Linux distribution that can work with minimal hardware. The users of this system were my parents, who know very little about computers and merely wanted a simple interface to browse the Web and check e-mails. I decided to make the system as simple as possible so that anyone could switch it on and start using it.

Here are the requirements specifications:

  1. Use low-profile hardware
  2. Quick booting
  3. Show my name during start up :-)
  4. Should not require entering a user name and password to log in to the system
  5. Show the Web browser with some URL, as default
Posted by stylesen

subconf 2009 LFY articleIn the last week of October 2009, I went to Munich, Germany in order to attend SubConf 2009 which is the annual user conference of the Subversion community. While I was on the trip, I wrote many blog posts for Linux for You magazine website whose links are as follows:

SubConf Day1

SubConfDay2

SubConfDay3

I ve clubbed all the above blog posts into a single article about my SubConf 2009 experiences, which got published in December 2009 issue of Linux For You magazine.

A gist from the article is follows, you can download the entire article from the attachment to this post,

SubConf is the annual conference of the Subversion community. SubConf 2009 was the third such event, held at Munich, Germany, from October 27 to 29, 2009. While it’s a user conference where Subversion users from various parts of the world participate, it does feature developer hackathons where the project’s core developers come together to discuss the roadmap, hack on code, et al. Developers also meet the users to get feedback, and study their requirements so that future releases can cater to these.

SubConf 2009 had 10 core Subversion developers at the conference venue—Stephen Butler, Stefan Sperling and Neels Hofmeyr (of Elego); Julian Foad of WANdisco; Greg Stein (a popular open source developer); Hyrum K. Wright (Subversion Corp), Lieven Govaerts, Bert Huijben (of The Competence Group), C. Michael Pilato and myself ( from Collabnet, Inc).

See attachment below to download the complete article in pdf.

Posted by stylesen

svn version compatibility LFY article coverThere exists a lot of confusion in choosing the compatible versions of Free Software. This article which I wrote for Linux For You magazine, published in December 2009 issue, was an attempt to explain the compatibility concerns of Free Software using Subversion Version control system.

A gist from the article is follows, you can download the entire article from the attachment to this post,

The toughest job for any server administrator is to choose the correct version of software to install and use for maintenance. Most server software have corresponding clients that access the software to get data from them. This kind of client-server model creates a few problems when a server administrator is trying to choose the right version of server software.

In this article, we will discuss one such problem in choosing the appropriate release of the popular version control system, Subversion. This article will also help decipher version compatibility among most of the free  software available.